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Remove 2TB drive for 2 blocks?

edited April 2012 in Scanner
So I've got a 2TB drive that has come up with 2 blocks marked as unreadable.   In a perfect world, I would see this as a sign to remove the drive and immediately replace it.   However, since the recent rebound of drive prices, I just can't afford it right now.    Whatever data *was* there has been lost (it was an episode of a TV show that I have since re-ripped).   Question is this.  Is Windows or DP smart enough to NOT use that part of this disk again?   I have duplication turned on for all of my data (yes, even my large TV and movie collection).

This is a 16 disk pool, with several disks with empty space.   I would rather leave the drive in there because MOST of the disk is just fine.   Understanding that this is a sign for things to come, and I will of course replace it when I can, but in the mean time is my WHS2011 server smart enough to not try to write to those bad blocks/sectors?

Comments

  • edited April 2012 Resident Guru
    Hi dvdluvver, sectors marked as bad by the file system (i.e. run a chkdsk /v on the drive and it should mention them) do NOT get written to by Windows (or thus, DP).

    The risk you are taking is that those might not be the only sectors that are (going) bad. You can run a chkdsk /v /r to check the disk for additional bad sectors (which on a 2TB disk will take quite a while!), but that will only find sectors that are bad "now". (edit: or Scanner, of course)

    At least with DP's duplication enabled, you should stand a better chance of avoiding loss - though I'm curious, was the lost file(s) duplicated at the time?
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